Category Archives: Affiliate Marketing

Denver Affiliate Conference Keynote On Transparency, Collaboration, Trust and Innovation

MediaTrust CEO, Peter Bordes, gave the keynote presentation at this year’s Affiliate Convention in Denver. He talked a lot about the need for transparency, collaboration, trust and innovation. He was joined by Steve Hartman of eBay, Wes Mahler of Tracking202, Steve Schaffer of Vertive and Rebecca Madigan of the Performance Marketing Alliance.

Here it is in it’s entirety.

Our 4th of July Revolution202 Launch

written by steven & nana

Happy Fourth of July to everyone in the U.S. and everyone who chooses to celebrate this holiday with us today, also known as Happy Independence Day! Today marks the launch of our new network, the Revolution202 Partner Network! It has been a long journey getting here and launching our own network but is also a natural progression in the growth of where 202 is headed. It is with this in mind that I wanted to announce our launch today. However, this is only a pre-launch and although we’re accepting applications starting today, this is currently invite only, meaning we’re limiting the number of affiliates who gets to be the first to join our network. Be one of the first to join and apply today!

With that said, it is important to note that if you are a current 202 user, your 202 username and password is universal across all 202 services. When applying for Revolution202, please login using your existing 202 username if you have one as this will make things much easier for you. If you’re new, don’t worry, you can still apply and create a new 202 account.

Today also marks a huge national holiday for the U.S., Independence Day. It is the anniversary of when the United States Declaration of Independence was signed 233 years ago, on July 4th, 1776, when the United States (the thirteen originally British colonies) officially gained its independence from the British Empire. This was the day our nation celebrated the birth of the United States; so in essence, the United States itself is celebrating its 233rd birthday.

The history behind how the United States were formed as a result of declaring its independence from the British Empire was the result of the occurrence of the American Revolutionary War, also known as the American War of Independence. The war began as a war between the Kingdom of Great Britain and thirteen united former British colonies on the North American continent, and ended in a global war between several European great powers. This war was the culmination of the political American Revolution, whereby the colonists rejected the right of the Parliament of Great Britain to govern them without representation.

In 1775, revolutionaries gained control of each of the thirteen colonial governments, set up the Second Continental Congress, and formed a Continental Army. Petitions to the king to intervene with the parliament on their behalf resulted in Congress being declared traitors and the states in rebellion the following year. The Americans responded by formally declaring their independence as a new nation, the United States of America, claiming sovereignty and rejecting any allegiance to the British monarchy.

The sources and interpretation of the Declaration has been the subject of much scholarly inquiry. The Declaration justified the independence of the United States by listing colonial grievances against King George III, and by asserting certain natural rights, including a right of revolution. Having served its original purpose in announcing independence, the text of the Declaration was initially ignored after the American Revolution. Its stature grew over the years, particularly the second sentence, a sweeping statement of human rights:

We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, that among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.

All this came about due to a change or shift and as a result of the American Revolution. The term “Revolution” can be defined as a sudden, momentous, radical, or complete change; a dramatic change or fundamental shift in the way of thinking or visualization; and activity or movement designed to effect the fundamental changes in the socioeconomy. It is with this definition in mind that we find it fitting to launch our Revolution202 Partner Network today. What are you waiting for? Join the Revolution!

Video Interview With Paul Bourque From UberAffiliate On Becoming An Advertiser

Paul Bourque is an extremely successful pay per click affiliate, runs the blog UberAffiliate.com and is now on route to becoming a large advertiser in our space. Paul is mainly known for his blog UberAffiliate.com which is focused on sharing tips and tricks to help you generate more revenue using PPC. You can find all of his articles by going to his Affiliate Marketing Guide. Please go through his guide if you have not had a chance to see all of the articles there. Many times we will simply read the most recent blog posts, but we forget that there are a lot of great posts that were also written in the past.

In this interview Paul talks about becoming an advertiser. After you’ve been in the industry for awhile you’ll notice once Affiliates start taking different paths. Some will create large affiliate networks, some will become advertisers, some will become service providers like us and of course some will continue to become bigger and bigger players in the affiliate space. Paul has decided to make the move to become one of the advertisers in the space and in this interview we’ve talked about his experiences and challenges in doing so.

You can read Paul’s blogger over at uberaffiliate.com, and you can follow him on twitter at twitter.com/uberaffiliate.com. If you’ve enjoyed this video post a comment to let us know what you think.

If you haven’t already, you can catch our recently posted video series through TV202:

If you enjoyed this interview, please subscribe to our blog, follow us on twitter and join our newsletter.

How Jonathan Volk Scaled Past $300,000/month (video interview)

We had a pleasure to interview Jonathan Volk, one of our very good friends, and a very successful affiliate marketer. Jonathan is the founder of Surge Marketing, a performance marketing company. Jonathan is best known for his blog “JonathanVolk.com” where he blogs about tips & strategies people can use to increase their PPC marketing efforts.

During Ad:Tech SF 2009, Jonathan and I had a lengthy interview about scaling PPC campaigns. Specifically we asked how he has scaled to over $300,000+/month in commissions, to learn how he did it watch the video! To read more of his stuff, visit Jonathan’s blog, or follow him on twitter at: twitter.com/jonathanvolk.

Stay tuned for theses up and coming interviews:

If you haven’t already, you can catch our recently posted video series through TV202:

If you enjoyed this interview, please subscribe to our blog, follow us on twitter and join our newsletter.

Meetup202 AdTech Speakers – Jonathan Volk, Ralph Ruckman, Dennis Yu, Larby Amirouche and Paul Bourque

Here are some speaker presentations during our meetup202 event last ad:tech. I think I probably had a little bit to much to drink before getting on stage, as you will notice. But we all still had a great time, if you missed it, check out our up and coming meetups here.

Jonathan Volk

Ralph Ruckman

Dennis Yu & Paul Bourque

Meetup202 Ad:Tech SF 2009 – Event Video

Check out our video from our largest Meetup202 event which held over 400+ people during Ad:Tech SF this year. We want to thank our sponsors, Hydra Network, ClickBooth, WebTraffic2Go and CPA Fuel for helping us put it together. Enjoy the clip!

PS: Be on look out for the next video. We will show the presentations from the speakers during the event.

Ryan Pamplin Video Interview On Affiliate Marketing & Operations

Ryan Pamplin is a good friend of ours that we first met at Affiliate Summit East 2008 in Boston. Ryan is the founder of Ryactive, a performance marketing company and is the co-organizer for the Meetup202 New York event. Ryan talks about general affiliate marketing, how to scale, how to setup partnership deals and affiliate deals with companies. Enjoy the interview!

Stay tuned for theses up and coming interviews:

If you haven’t already, you can catch our recently posted video series through TV202:

If you enjoyed this interview, please subscribe to our blog, follow us on twitter and join our newsletter.

Stats202 Beta Launch

We are currently accepting beta testers for our new service, Stats202. Stats202 is a hosted application that will automatically update all your subids for you if you are currently using Tracking202 or Prosper202. As a result, you no longer have to manually log into each affiliate network to update your stats saving you lots of time, particularly if you run campaigns on multiple networks.

In addition to automating your earnings report, there is also a mobile web app for you to check your stats on the go if you have an Apple iPhone, Google G1, or Blackberry! Use of Stats202 is free during beta but please be aware that this will be a paid service. Try Stats202 today!


Interview with Dr Ngo ( Charles Ngo ) On Media Buys

Meet Charles Ngo, better known as Dr Ngo. Dr Ngo is an active member of the WickedFire community and is known for his Media Buy expertise. A fast rising super affiliate, he has some very insightful tips to share with those looking to get into Media Buys as well as explaining what Media Buys are for those who are unfamiliar with the term.

We had a chance to interview Dr Ngo during the Affiliate Summit Event in Las Vegas earlier this year among several other interviews we did. With the major rise of niches such as Acai and Facial products, Media Buys were one of the major outlets for running such offers. Here Dr Ngo shares some tips that has made him successful. Check out the interview below.

 

 

Stay tuned for theses up and coming interviews:

  • Ryan Pamplin ( Ryactive ) – Affiliate Operations & Affiliate Deals

If you haven’t already, you can catch our recently posted video series through TV202:

If you enjoyed this interview, please subscribe to our blog, follow us on twitter and join our newsletter.

If you are interested in being interviewed and have something worth sharing with the 202 community at a future event, please contact Steven at [email protected] for further details.

If I Had To Do It All Over Again

In every one of our interviews I asked the other person, “If you had to do it all over again what would you do differently?”  It was interesting to see the responses from people and for the most part they said they’d do it all over the same exact way.  But if I look back on my past and if I had to do it all over again, I absolutely would not have done it the same way.  In fact I know had I done it differently I’d be in a much better position years ago than I even am now.  Even though maybe they said I’d do it the same all over again because their lifestyle is good now, I still find it hard to believe that if they know what they know now, they’d repeat and do the same things over again.  Here’s what I’d do differently and this little bit of wisdom could easily shave off around 4 years of your learning curve, especially if your planning on trying to build a company and create your own product.

If I had to do it all over again I would not have wasted my time trying to build out several different unscalable businesses that would never get to be big over the course of 4 years.  Four years…. I wasted alot of time, had I only known.  

I was watching a presentation from Gurbaksh Chahal [vid1, vid2, vid3], and what really struck me is how he built a company from the age of 16, and sold it in a few years for 40 million.  He’d sign a non-compete agreement for about 3 years, after it finished he’d then do it again and later sell Blue Lithium which was sold for over $300 million.  What was most interesting to me about the whole story was not about his humble beginnings of having nothing and then becoming a successful serial entrepreneur who now in his later twenties is now worth hundreds of millions of dollars, instead what was interesting to me, is “How He Did It,” but even more than that, it was most interested that “How he got the idea to begin with.”  And HOW he got the idea the way he did, resulted in him being positioned in a marketplace with a product that had an exit that could be capitalized with a high probability if then just executed. 

Gurbaksh was 16 and he was trying to make some extra money, he actually applied to work at McDonalds and got denied.  From there he just decided he could make money on his own.  He began researching how to make money and he found a company called DoubleClick.  He thought to himself, “DoubleClick seems to be doing good, maybe I can just do what they do”.  And what a good idea, and a great place to start.  Right there at that momment he was about to build something, that if he excuted would be worth something, right there he positioned himself in a marketplace that had alot more potential.    And he saw that DoubleClick had an ad-serving technology that was performing well and G, which is Gurbaksh’s nickname, decided to make a DoubleClick Ad-Serving Compeitior.  Which he did.  And then he begun programming the thing at the age of 16 and then later sold the thing in several years for over $40 million dollars. That company was ClickAgents.

Now heres the lesson to learn, and learn it well because this can really help you if you plan on building a product and re-selling it.  What G did, and why it became a quicker success is simply because he took an existing model that was already working well and copied it.  His business plan was simple, make an ad-serving technology like DoubleClick, do some things differently or whatever, and build out a technology that “already has a demand for it”  Build a product that already has a market and a high chance of making money if he could just execute.”   And just by having the right idea, and jumping into an already active and lucrative market he was able to position himself to make alot of money if he could execute properly, which he did, $40 million dollars worth of execution before he was even 20……

And then look at me.  I was building an eBay business in high-school re-selling peoples stuff, I started a car audio and installation business during that time, and then trying to build small websites at the time.  Only if I had chosen something a little more scalable like G did when I first got started…  I spent about 2 years doing that, and working a job. Which was great, but it would have been better if I started doing a doubleclick when I was a kid, instead of working a job and trying this ebay thing.

Then leaving high school I thought it would be great to build a craigslist for colleges.  I spent 9 months on that, which we built well, we built culture just like we do with meetup202 now, but later that’d fail.  Why was I wasting time trying to build a craigslist for colleges, to sell textbooks?  

Then I got in to multi-level marketing which honestly was great because I learned so many personal development skills, sales, presentation skills and communication skills, but I spent 6 months on it and that diddn’t materalize.  After the college sites and MLM I now offically spent a year on two businesses that weren’t really scallable. I diddn’t know what I was doing.

I would later quit that try to do real-estate for 3-6 months, then go back to school where I’d then spend 9 months building a local rental site for college campuses.  Then finally my friend introduced me to affiliate marketing, which was a quick way to produce income for myself, and my friends Sean and Noah over at GetClicky created an analytics company GetClicky that was doing well.  I then decided we could do some type of search analytics for affiliate marketers and Tracking202 began.  I only wish I would have jumped into Tracking202, or even just a more scalable sector more early on.

I mean lets compare, here I’am for 4 years trying to develop some cool website and try to develop my own business model around it, and at age 16 G copies DoubleClick, an already succesful enterprise company and jumps into a competitve market, executes then a makes a fortune.  

Do you see the difference?  It’s so simple.  Because he started with a better idea mocking off an existing idea he instantly put himself in a better position for growth.  While here I’m figuring it out, I would have been so much better had I even just picked a product and competed with the other companies in the space.  

Know that competitors in the space qualifies the market because something is there.  And it sometimes sucks being the first in the marketplace with a new product, it is extremely difficult.  You have to pioneer the business model and make everything work. And if you do succeed and finally make it work, you’ve qualified the market and now competitors will jump in.  If you just take an existing product that is already doing well and already sells tons of items, but you can simply do it better you’ve already put yourself ahead of the game than some silly web 2.0 internet entrepreneurs trying to make some crazy widget that has no model or no business model.  

Listen, I wasted so much time, I hope you can find some value off of this.  If I had to do it all over again I would have chosen a product that already had an existing market, I would not be trying to develop some new web 2.0 product that has no real business model or something that I’m trying to invent.   Luckily now we have finally found a product with a real business model, there is plenty of competitors in the space, most of our competitors are VC’d backed and there is a market here.  And we have many different business models we can spin off of Tracking202 and its all now because we are entering a market that other people are already in and we are going to try to do it better than what everyone else is doing.  I still have friends making silly websites that will never become anything.  

Just Keep It Simple:

  • Wes, age of 16, tries ebay, working job, local craigslist, mlm, real-estate, local rental sites, and then finally finds PPC Analytics a finally scalable product and begins. compared to.
  • G, age of 16, said “Ah DoubleClick looks like a good business to get into, bam— does it and sells outs for $40 million”
  • — G would later do it again selling Blue Lithium for $300 million, by again, making an ad-serving technology.

I hope you get the picture. 

Learn from my mistakes, this is one of the things I would do differently had I do it all over again. I wish I woulda have saw a better model to start with and copy, I wasted 4 years of my time experimenting and only now coming to understand the importance of it.  And the funniest thing is I don’t even think G recognized that idea when he got started.  He just saw that seems like a good idea, I thought ebay was a good idea.  I should have programmed an ad serving technology 6 YEARS AGO, but I didn’t know.  

This is just one of the things I would have done if I had to do it all over again. Another short thing to tack on to this, I should have moved to Silicon Valley 4 years ago and dropped out of college or even high-school honestly.  G grew up in the silicon valley when his parents moved as well, so that also helped him.  Your location does affect your startup.  If you don’t agree with me, try moving to alaska and doing a web 2.0 startup.. Location does matter, its about being in the best spot you can be to build your business. For us that is here, and its one of the best business moves we’ve ever made. If your serious about web development, you should really be here.

If you found this interesting, please comment and let me know what you think. -wes